Clinical Trials Connection

A clinical trial matching tool for the T1D community

Participating in a clinical trial is a great way to contribute to curing, preventing and treating T1D and its complications. Start your search below to find clinical trials that need people like you.

Is a clinical trial right for you and your family?

MYTH:

Clinical trials already have all the participants they need.

MYTH:

Clinical trials already have all the participants they need.

T1D Reality

About 20,000 people are needed for T1D trials in the U.S., but researchers have reported a massive shortage of participants. More than 80 percent of clinical trials are delayed or fail because doctors cannot find enough patients to take part.

MYTH:

Taking part in a clinical trial is scary and unpleasant.

MYTH:

Taking part in a clinical trial is scary and unpleasant.

T1D Reality

Reality: Knowing what to expect before you join can help ease anxieties you might have about the trial. Before joining a clinical trial, it’s important to ask questions and get a sense of what will be required in the clinical trial. If certain medical tests, such as an X-ray scan, for example, make you uncomfortable, ask in advance if those or other procedures will be part of the clinical trial. Many clinical trial participants report a positive experience. In a 2017 study from CISCRP, 91% of clinical trial participants surveyed said they would “definitely” or “probably” recommend clinical trial participation to a friend or family member. Talking to someone who has participated in the past can help you learn what to expect.

MYTH:

A clinical trial might help people in the future but won’t do anything for me right now.

MYTH:

A clinical trial might help people in the future but won’t do anything for me right now.

T1D Reality

Reality: Clinical trials may provide an opportunity to access new medical advances. In some cases, participants are able to continue the therapy after the end of the trial if it’s found to be effective. Participants also receive free, quality care at top facilities throughout the trial. And many participants appreciate being able to help move research forward.

More T1D Clinical Trial Myths and Realities

Myth: Once I sign up for a clinical trial, I can’t get out of it if I no longer want to participate.

Reality: Clinical trial participants can leave a trial for any reason, at any time. Before joining a clinical trial, you’ll be asked to sign an informed consent form, which outlines the details of the trial. It’s not a contract, though—even after you sign it, you can leave the trial at any time.

Myth: Taking part in a clinical trial is too disruptive to my life.

Reality: When you’re considering participating in a clinical trial, it is important to think about how much time you are willing to spend and to get a sense of how many site visits will be required, how long the trial will run, etc. Some trials may require just a few site visits without any overnight stays, while others may be more time-consuming. Some trials even allow you to provide information remotely through an electronic device, for example, or offer transportation to and from the study site so the trial will fit better in your schedule.

Myth: Clinical trials are a last resort.

Reality: Clinical trials can offer an option for those who have exhausted other therapies, but they can also be an option at any point after your diagnosis. Any time you’re not happy with your current treatment, a clinical trial may be a way to access a therapy that may work better or to receive more personalized medical care. Some people also choose to participate because they’re motivated to help move research forward.

Myth: If I’m in the placebo group of a clinical trial, I won’t get medical treatment.

Reality: Many clinical trials do not use placebos; some compare a potential new therapy against an already approved therapy. Participants who do receive a placebo still receive personalized, quality care from top doctors as part of the study.

Join the All of Us Research Program

JDRF is proud to partner with the National Institutes of the Health on All of Us Research Program. The goal of this program is to gather health information from more than a million Americans to accelerate precision medicine research and medical breakthroughs, and improve health–and it's critical that the T1D community is represented.

Learn more

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